Back on track

Well it seems teaching is over and the Autumn term was too much for Dave and I to keep feeding this blog.

We also had a very interesting and thought provoking meeting at UC Irvine entitled “Payment Technologies: Past, Present and Future” (read an excellent summary by Irving Wladawsky-Berger&lt) and I also had a couple of presentations at industry conferences (I am serialising the summaries underCurrent issues in payments within the Light Blue Touchpaper blog).

So rather than boast about our travels, I wanted to restart our thoughts on cashlessness through a provocation and with the help of an apparently unrelated article that caught my attention. Entitled “How Memes Are Orchestrated by the Man“, Kevin Ashton of The Atlantic, tells a very detailed and well documented story of how commercial interest rather than a new Internet culture that which propelled the Harlem Shuffle to stardom. Interestingly, it says the meme died in February, but I still find big references to it, chief among them this one in the Mexican football classic a couple of days ago – and my football blind, eldest son immediately knew what this was about.

But what is relevant to this forum is the following extract:

Google regards clicks and views as a “currency,” and take pains to get the numbers right, but unlike most other mass media, its figures are not verified by anyone who does not profit from higher numbers.

and goes on to conclude

The technology may have changed, but the money still flows the same way: to creators of contracts not creators of content.

And that got me thinking of Jon Matonis and other supporters of cryptocurrencies (see for instance Bitcoin Prevents Monetary Tyranny) or mobile wallets for that matter. Why? Because more often than not, the proponents of digital payments are focusing their discussion on content and are naive of institutional change.

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This entry was posted in @batizlazo, News by bbatiz. Bookmark the permalink.

About bbatiz

I have edited NEP-HIS since 1999 and its blog in 2010. My background is economics and business history. I am currently at Bangor Business School (Wales) and my research interests are broadly in applications of computer technology, retail banking and the cashless society.

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