New Working Paper: Mobile Payments in Turkey

One of our primary activities here at the Cashless Society Project is to develop working papers that examine the idea of a cashless society from historical, contemporary, and international perspectives. In keeping with that, I’m thrilled to announce that we’ve recently posted a new working paper on Mobile Payment Systems in Turkey, written by Nurdilek Dalziel and Can Ali Avunduk. Both Nurdilek and Can Ali have spent time working in the Turkish banking sector, so their paper provides a insider perspective on how the Turkish banks and mobile telephony providers are currently approaching electronic payment services.

The paper opens with a brief overview of Turkish electronic payments in general, but then quickly dives into what they refer to as “direct carrier billing (DCB).” DCB is an approach to mobile payments where the mobile network operator (e.g., Turkcell, Vodafone, etc) manages the accounts and plays the central clearing role instead of a bank or bank-owned service organization. With this approach, anyone with a mobile phone can send and receive electronic payments, even if that person doesn’t have a bank account. The authors estimate that of Turkey’s 74 million inhabitants, 27 million (37%) do not currently have bank accounts, but most of those do own some kind of mobile phone. Thus, DCB could be one method by which this “unbanked” section of the population can gain access to electronic payments.

Of course, DCB also has the potential to cut the Turkish banks out of the payments game if they are not careful. So far, the authors report, the growth of DCB schemes is quite small, their networks are limited, many consumers don’t seem to be aware of their existence, and the overall payment volumes are actually restricted by the system for fear of fraud. Thus, DCB systems do not yet pose any kind of serious threat to the Turkish banks, and the authors see them more as supplements to the existing banking system rather than substitutes.

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